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Bulkheads

Author Topic: Bulkheads  (Read 4067 times)

Anne Nash

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Bulkheads
« on: July 09, 2010, 03:34:39 PM »
As you travel around the canals of our lovely neighborhood, one can not help notice the many bulkheads that are failing.  We must enforce the no wake laws. It is amazing to me the number of boats and seadoos that are going making wakes. Surely these homeowners realize the wave action undermines the bulkheads and weakens them. Does anyone have any ideas on how to increase awareness of the damage wakes cause?

Boater

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Re: Bulkheads
« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2010, 09:33:44 PM »
Are you reflecting hearsay or is there some engineering study indicating why typical wakes might have some effect on the bulkheads greater than the observations below?

A little wave surely has little effect compared to the immense weight change of the entire level of water going up and down with tidal changes not to mention the tremendous flow of water that comes with it.  

Also a big effect is the difference in soil moisture and weight caused by rain in the yards.   Dry soil weighs less than wet soil.   This is also constantly changing due to the tide levels.  

And then there is the fact that the metal tie backs are simply rusting through.   Nothing is going to save the bulkhead at this point.   I suspect this has been aggravated by the salt water brought into the sub soil of our yards from Katrina.  If you immediately put in new tie back rods or drive pilings at the first sign of failure you might be able to save it.  

Without hearing engineering data otherwise I will assume the facts surrounding bulkhead problems caused by normal boat traffic have originated from supposition.

Looking forward to hearing more -
« Last Edit: July 30, 2010, 09:28:35 AM by Boater »

Water Lover

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Re: Bulkheads
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2010, 07:46:55 AM »
http://www.fish.state.pa.us/anglerboater/2007/05sepoct/feat1wakes.pdf

Please check this article about wakes. One of many on the web. I think it will debate some of your "suppositions".

Previous post did not even address the damage wakes do our boats that are too big for hoists. Talk about damage!

Boater

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Re: Bulkheads
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2010, 10:03:37 AM »
Ref. Water Lover article:

Obviously, the referenced article in the link addresses true wakes, none of which would ever belong in our neighborhood.   And of course never in a manner that would cause moored boats to tug at their lines. 

I was only addressing the bulkhead structure aspect as it relates to what would be expected from a correctly operated passing boat in our neighborhood.

Looking forward to more discussion on how to save our bulkheads -

retired63

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Re: Bulkheads
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2010, 05:30:40 PM »
Last week I had to place another 15 - 80lb bags of concrete to fill in the erosion behind my bulkhead. That amounts to 1, 200 pounds. Last year I placed 40 bags which is 3,200 pounds. With added top soil this amounts to over 2 tons of material. I had to hire labor to hand mix and place this concrete.
I live on West side of Southern Star. Our canal is a main exit for the many boats making way to the lake from the rear portions of Eden Isles. Boats constantly exceed the dead slow speed and cause wakes. These wakes get through gaps and under the bulkheads. One neighbor further down lost his bulkhead 2 years ago. If I lose mine I will have to tear down my boat house and dock to gain access to install a new bulkhead. I am told that I could be looking at $40,000 to replace everything.
It is time to get the Marine Unit of the Sheriffs department to sit on some of our docks and catch these violaters. They should be given citations not warnings. All of us affected have been warning boats to slow down for years. It is time to enforce laws to protect property.

Keithsails

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Re: Bulkheads
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2018, 03:57:02 PM »
Has anyone ever jetted in a piling in Eden Isle? My concern is the hard clay bottom. Thoughts?

Keith

Lee Longstreet

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Re: Bulkheads
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2018, 11:02:42 AM »
Bulkheads normally fail due to maintenance issues and the force of nature.

Tidal changes that occur every day cause immense weight changes against the bulkheads far greater than boat wakes not to mention the tremendous flow of water that accompanies the running of the tide.

Also a big effect is the difference in soil moisture and the accompanying weight change caused by rain in the yards.   Dry soil weighs less than wet soil.   This is also constantly changing due to the tide levels.  Having a backyard pool or higher lot elevation also exhibits additional force on the bulkheads.  Ever wonder why the bulkheads fail outward? This is because the yard is pushing more than the water. 

And then there is the fact that the metal tie backs holding the bulkheads in place are simply rusting through.   Nothing is going to save the bulkhead at this point.   This has been aggravated by the salt water brought into the sub soil of our yards from Katrina and other high water events.  The closer you are to the lake the more salt you will be exposed to.  Costal Florida residents and municipalities have vastly increased maintenance and failure problems related to salt water.  If you immediately put in new tie back rods or drive pilings at the first sign of failure you might be able to save it.  Eventually every bulkhead will require maintenance. 

All of the above naturally occurring forces of nature vastly outweigh any effect of typical boat wakes we see here in Eden Isles relative to bulkhead failure. 

Wakes should be minimal to prevent damage and unreasonable motion to moored boats.  Wakes develop relative to a vessel's theoretical hull speed.  This is generally accepted as 1.34 times the square root of the water line length of the boats hull.  Speed must be kept significantly below this for minimum wake.  Hull shape also plays a part in making wakes.  Because of the physics relating to theoretical hull speed small boats like wave runners will generate wakes at a slower speed than a large boat traveling at a faster speed. 

One should also observe wakes with reason.  For instance when windy there is a ripple on the water and many so called wakes just blend in with that whereas the same boat at the same speed could be called out by the same person on a dead calm day for making a ripple on the water which may be confused as a wake - I've see it happen.  Real wakes are those forces exhibited by a passing boat that cause moored boats to unreasonably tug on their lines. 

Wakes should be kept to a minimum.  After looking at some of the pictures of passing boats that have been posted on "Nextdoor" I am only providing real info to keep people from getting into legal battles that after much expense they will loose.  Quite frankly I have seen the Coast Guard, Wildlife Enforcement and St. Tammany water patrol boats make wakes bigger than some of those pictures.  PS, I am not in those pictures and keep my wake to a minimum.   
« Last Edit: May 23, 2018, 11:32:00 AM by Lee Longstreet »